Publications

Book

2015    Metropolitan Tragedy: Genre, Justice, and the City in Early Modern England. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.

Peer-reviewed Articles and Books Chapters

Forthcoming “Playing (In) the Streets: The Merchant of Venice and Adaptation.” Games and Theatre in Early Modern England, edited by Gina Bloom, Tom Bishop, and Erika T. Lin. Amsterdam University Press.

Forthcoming Co-author with Elizabeth Williamson, “Caucusing in the Classroom: A Strategy for Authentically Engaging Difference.” Teaching Literature in the Online Classroom, edited by John Miller and Julie Wilhelm (MLA).

2019    “Critically Regional Shakespeare.” Shakespeare Bulletin 37, no. 3: 341-363.

2018    “Webster’s Horse-Play.” Arrêt sur Scène/Scene Focus. Special Issue on The Duchess of Malfi, edited by Florence March and Nathalie Rivère de Carles. 7. http://www.ircl.cnrs.fr/productions%20electroniques/arret_scene/arret_scene_focus_7_2018.htm.

2017    “Milton Much Revolving.” Modern Language Quarterly. Special Issue on Milton and Periodization, edited by Rachel Trubowitz. 78, no. 3: 373-393.

2017    “Revenge Tragedy.” In A New Companion to Renaissance Drama, 2nd ed., edited by Arthur Kinney and Thomas Hopper. 403-416. Oxford: Wiley Blackwell.

2015    “Processions and History in Shakespeare and Fletcher’s Henry VIII.” English Literary Renaissance 45, no. 2: 275-302.

2013    “Rethinking ‘local’ Shakespeare: The case of The Merchant of Santa Fe.Journal of the Wooden O: 15-24.

2011    “The Tyranny of Tragedy: Catharsis in England and The Roman Actor.” Renaissance Drama n.s. 39: 163-196.

2009    “Women and the Theatre in Thomas Heywood’s London.” In The Idea of the City: Early-Modern, Modern and Post-Modern Locations and Communities, edited by Joan Fitzpatrick. 79-89. Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.

2007    “Crossing from Scaffold to Stage: Execution Processions and Generic Conventions in The Comedy of Errors and Measure for Measure.” In Shakespeare and Historicist Formalism, edited by Stephen Cohen. 183-209. Aldershot: Ashgate Press.

2007    “Signs of the Crimes: Topography, Murder, and Early Modern Domestic Tragedy.” Genre 40, no. 1/2: 1-29.

Scholarly Reviews

2020    Producing Early Modern London: A Comedy of Urban Space, 1598-1616, by Kelly J. Stage, in Shakespeare Quarterly, 70, no. 1: 90-92.

2019    Tragedy and the Return of the Dead, by John Lyons, in Renaissance Quarterly, 72, no. 4: 1541-42.

2018    The Oxford Handbook of Shakespearean Tragedy, edited by Michael Neill and David Schalkwyk, in Shakespeare Studies 46: 294-302

2018    Separation Scenes: Domestic Drama in Early Modern England, by Ann C. Christensen, in Modern Philology 115, no. 4: E235-E237.

2016    Taking Exception to the Law: Materializing Injustice in Early Modern English Literature, edited by Donald Beecher, Travis DeCook, Andrew Wallace, and Grant Williams, in English Studies in Canada 42, no. 3-4: 190-193.

2015    Emulation on the Shakespearean Stage,by Vernon Guy Dickson, in Comparative Drama 49, no. 2: 225-228.

2011    The Cambridge Companion to English Renaissance Tragedy,edited by Emma Smith and Garrett A. Sullivan Jr., in Renaissance Quarterly 64, no. 2: 265-267.

2011    Thomas Heywood’s Theatre, 1599-1639: Locations, Translations, and Conflict,by Richard Rowland, in Shakespeare Bulletin 29, no. 2: 267-271.

2008    City/Stage/Globe: Performance and Space in Shakespeare’s London, by D. J. Hopkins, in Shakespeare Bulletin 26, no. 4: 137-141.

2006    Theater review of Richard III, The Tempest, Much Ado About Nothing, As You Like It, and Othello, in Shakespeare Bulletin 24, no. 4: 91-99.

Public-Facing Writing

2020 Co-author with Elizabeth Williamson, “Rethinking Productivity during COVID-19,” Academic Leader, July 6, 2020. https://www.academic-leader.com/topics/promotiontenure/rethinking-productivity-in-the-era-of-covid-19/

2020 “What counts as proximity?,” Inside Higher Ed, Feb. 26, 2020, https://www.insidehighered.com/advice/2020/02/26/academe-needs-expand-optionsworking-remotely-and-reconsider-what-counts-proximity

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